The Ultimate Guide to the State of Gay Rights Around The World

Gay rights are an extension of human rights that in most cases cover all other non-heterosexual relationships including lesbianism and bisexual individuals, the State of Gay Rights Around The World are explained below.

In its broader sense, gay rights are meant to ensure equal and fair treatment of people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT).

Overhead Gay Rights Figures

Out of 195 countries extensively studied, 96 countries have not decriminalized or documented being gay as a crime.

Gay marriage is legal in only 27 countries currently, with Germany being the last to pass the laws and Taiwan on the verge of making it the next country to do the same in 2019. India decriminalized the practice of being gay in 2018 but gay marriage is still not recognized by law.

The State of Gay Rights Around The World Continues

In Israel, gay marriage is recognized by law and they can even adopt a child but the marriage cannot be conducted in Israel itself.

Gay marriage is illegal in 72 countries mostly states in the Middle East, Asia and 30 countries in Africa. Now this means that the law specifically bans homosexuality, with 8 of the 72 nations making gay relations and relationship capital offenses punishable by death.

Countries like Pakistan and Mauritania have the law in theory with no confirmed death sentences carried out yet but it’s a practice in Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Northern Nigeria and Islamic States of Somalia, Syria, and Iraq.

About 3 billion people live in countries where gay marriage is categorically illegal. About 400 million people live in nations where just being gay is a capital offense.

In the 70-plus countries, homophobia is propagated by the penalties that are established through the law to persecute gay people with the backing of constitutions.

In some places where gay marriage is illegal, laws are being updated to include bisexuals and lesbians. Some nations allow lesbianism but not gay relationships but nowhere is lesbianism banned and being gay allowed.

Countries like Bolivia, Fiji, the United Kingdoms, the island of Malta and Ecuador have laws declaring discrimination against gay men, lesbians and bisexual individuals illegal.

This is meant to curb the stigma that is associated with being gay and especially homophobic hate crimes like violence, torture unprovoked arrests, and even death.

Malta and Ecuador are also among the few countries that ban conversion therapy on a national level and are among the top 10 countries in the world that support Gay Rights.

Add Comment